Redware
by 
JULIA SMITH,
Historic Pottery Reproductions.
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English 
Slipware
N. Holland 
and 
Werra Ware
Mugs and
Pitchers
Cooking 
Vessels
Bowls and 
other items

REDWARE,  also known as terra cotta, is a variety of earthenware whose body of soft porous clay turns red, orange, or brown when fired due to its high iron content. Pieces of European redware were among the household goods of the earliest English settlers, and redware was imported commercially throughout the colonial period. Domestic production in America started as early as 1625. The first redware produced in the Northeast followed English models, though a Germanic tradition appeared at an early date as well. 

Most, but not all, redware was covered with a glaze, either clear or colored. Particular glazes were sometimes associated with particular wares, such as the distinctive blackish-blue glaze used on English "Cistercian" ware. Further decoration might be added through a variety of means including painting, sgrafitto (in which lines are scratched in the body of the piece) and slip trailing (in which designs are "drawn" with a liquid clay mixture of a different color). The widely-traded 17th century German redware called Werra-ware combined all these techniques to great effect. 

Each piece of reproduction redware has been copied from an original artifact after extensive research. Like the original, it has been made entirely hand and shows the minor variations from piece to piece typical of professional handcraft production. 

Hand-wash your redware and allow it to dry thoroughly. A paste made from baking soda rubbed gently on the affected area will remove any staining, such as that from coffee. Because redware remains slightly porous, pieces which are to hold liquids for any length of time should sit on a trivet or saucer. The glaze is lead-free.